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Car Leasing Edinburgh

CAR LEASING EDINBURGH

Throughout the Edinburgh area, we can offer a great car leasing service, we have found that the type of car required is as varied as the area, so whether it is a SUV, Saloon or a nifty run around we can help you. Not forgetting our van drivers, we can find the one that suits your daily personal or business needs.

Leaseline is family run and owned company, we pride ourselves on providing an honest straight forward service, finding you the best price for the vehicle you want.

ABOUT EDINBURGH

The Old Town of Edinburgh stretches from the gates of Edinburgh Castle, down the length of the Royal Mile, and outwards from that cobbled 'spine'.

The narrow 'closes' or 'wynds' which emanate from the Royal Mile give this part of Edinburgh it's character and have existed, along with much of the Old Town of today, since medieval times.

In the 16th century, the area was dominated by high-rise buildings stretching up to 14 stories high. One such construction ended in disaster when the building collapsed and there is a plaque in its place on the Royal Mile commemorating the victims.

This part of Edinburgh is not only famous for the castle, but also for Edinburgh's 'Underground City', a series of vaults which were mainly inhabited by Irish immigrants during the industrial revolution. The most famous of these recently excavated areas is 'Mary Kings Close' which attracts and enthrals visitors from around the globe. The royal Mile is probably the most convenient location for overseas visitors to seek Edinburgh hotels. The Royal Mile and the surrounding area is also a gret place to find fine bars and restaurants.

The Scottish parliament and Holyrood Palace are also located in Edinburgh's Old Town, along with Edinburgh University, The Royal Museum of Scotland and the 'Dynamic Earth' visitor attraction.

Edinburgh New Town History

By the 18th century the Old Town area of Edinburgh surrounding the Royal Mile was bursting at the seams and could no longer cope with it's swelling population. In addition many families were becoming more wealthy and longed to move farther away from the lower classes and their slums.

In 1766 a competition was launched which enabled architects and town planners to submit designs for the New Town layout. In the end a design by a young architect named James Craig. Craig's design was modified slightly (chiefly some street name changes) by King George III, but in essence remained true to the original plans. One notable change was that of 'St Giles Street' to 'Princes Street'. The King disliked St Giles being the patron saint of lepers, and so renamed what is now Edinburgh's main street in his son's honour.

Edinburgh's New Town now includes the main shopping districts of the city and some of the best hotels in Edinburgh, as well as Edinburgh's financial sector in 'The West End'. Other worldly recognisable buildings of the New Town include Waverly Station and the National Gallery of Scotland.

New Town streets known even to foreign visitors include Rose Street, Queen Street, George Street, Hanover Street, Thistle Street, Frederick Street and Castle Street.

The buildings constructed as part of the original New Town are considered in modern times to be some of the finest examples of Georgian architecture anywhere in the world.